Inspiration and motivation

Submit   the stuff that keeps me going...

yoruhiru:

herochan:

Batman Through Mexican Creativity

Created by Kimbal

(via:vyntic)

crimsonjoker eh? eeeh?

— 16 hours ago with 7412 notes
David Bowie during the Berlin era. So beautiful. 

David Bowie during the Berlin era. So beautiful. 

(Source: davidbowieobsession, via shinyorangemushroom)

— 2 days ago with 728 notes

imightbemajin:

BLACKER THAN THE BLACKEST BLACK
TIIMES INFINITY

(Source: icecry, via tahitithal)

— 2 days ago with 1755 notes

terezi-tiesrope:

Lace Crowns — Quick Microwave Method 
makes ONE 18” crown
 

1/2 yard crocheted lace

  • (Also look for “Cluny Lace” or “Dyeable Cotton Lace”.  You can find the lace I used for these crowns HERE)
  • Fabric Stiffener (I used Aleene’s Stiffen Quick) 
  • Small bowl
  • Tacky Glue
  • 1 sheet posterboard
  • scissors
  • clear packing tape
  • paper plate or parchment paper
  • thin butterknife or offset spatula
  • sewing pin
  • Gold or silver metallic paint**
  • Rubber gloves
  • Paint brush
  • Hot glue gun or a jewelry adhesive (I used Aleene’s Platinum Bond Glass & Bead) 
  • Vintage jewelry, rhinestones, jeweled scrapbook trim, etc…

Step 1:  Place lace in a small bowl and cover with fabric stiffener.  Soak for 15 minutes.

Step 2:  While lace is soaking, prepare a crown form by cutting a 20” x 4” strip of posterboard.  If using a smaller piece, cut two 10.5” x 4” pieces.  Overlap by a 1/2” and tape together on the front and back.

Step 3:  Roll the posterboard in to a tube, 17.5” in circumference, and secure with packing tape.

Step 4: Remove lace from bowl, allowing excess to gently drip back in to the bowl.  Return excess stiffener to the original bottle.  Wrap the wet lace around the base of the posterboard form.  I used a spot of tacky glue to hold the overlapping ends of the lace together.

Step 5:  Put crown and form on a paper plate or piece of parchment.  Microwave on high power for 30 seconds.  There may be some crackling sounds in this initial phase. Continue to microwave in 30 second increments (depending on the power of your microwave, you might be able to go up to a max of 1 minute increments), until the lace is dry to the touch.
 
Step 6:  Remove plate from microwave and completely spray the crown (while still on the form) with stiffener.  Return to microwave and microwave in short increments till it is dry to the touch.
 
Step 7:  Repeat the process of spraying and drying until you’ve achieved the desired level of stiffness.  For me, I found that 7 spray/dry cycles was sufficient.
 
Step 8:  Remove crown from the form.  You may need to slide a butterknife or offset spatula underneath to help loosen it.  If some of the stiffener has closed up some of the holes in the lace, you can easily clean it out with the end of a pin.
Step 9:  Return the crown to the plate and microwave for an additional 30 seconds to a minute.  When removed from microwave, crown should be completely dry and stiff.  Set the crown aside while you set up your paint
 
Step 10:  Wearing rubber gloves to keep your hands clean, paint the crown, inside and out.  Do not be surprised when the crown goes soft with the application of the wet paint.  It will stiffen, harder than ever, when it dries.
Step 11:  Gently slide the wet crown back on to the posterboard form.  Set aside to dry.  You can use a hairdryer to help speed up the process, but DO NOT return the crown to the microwave. 
 
Step 12:  When crown is dry, attach bits of glitz and finery with a hot glue gun or jewelry glue.  I used bits of broken vintage jewelry that I dismantled with the help of tin snips.
 

(via tahitithal)

— 2 days ago with 4054 notes

asylum-art:

Mermersing  Paper Art Made From Strips Of Colored Paper by Yulia Brodskaya

artyulia.com | Facebook Amazon  | Twitter | Pinterest 

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

There are a million and one ways to make art of paper (as we proved in our paper art post), but there’s one artist who recently caught our eye (again). Yulia Brodskaya, an artist and illustrator born in Moscow, creates stunning works of art using the quilled paper technique.

While quilled paper seems simple at first glance, we’ve never seen someone whose work matches Brodskaya’s in terms of detail, color and expressiveness. This art is create by rolling or bending strips of paper and gluing their side to the surface. This makes them essentially lines, but the paper’s width gives these “lines” a depth that 2d art can lack.

Via: boredpanda

(via shinyorangemushroom)

— 4 days ago with 6181 notes
pickledpennies:

seen at Kew Gardens, London

pickledpennies:

seen at Kew Gardens, London

(via yarn-over)

— 1 week ago with 26 notes
govango:

I’ve been on a weird Adrien Brody kick lately. His nose is fun to draw. lol My photo reference is here.

govango:

I’ve been on a weird Adrien Brody kick lately. His nose is fun to draw. lol My photo reference is here.

— 1 week ago with 50 notes